Why We Love Our Rocna.

September, 2013

We live in Southern California and keep our 48 foot Cal 1966 classic boat in Ventura Harbor. Those of us who live here are lucky enough to have 2 of the 7 Channel Islands fairly close to us so we sail out and anchor along shore enjoying the natural hiking and wildlife the islands have. There is a nature preserve all around the islands so everything grows naturally.

Many of the anchorages have rocky or grassy bottoms. This can make for some slippery anchoring and a lot of sleepless nights when the wind picks up. Our old anchor was a replica anchor that had a little plow on the end. It had pulled up twice on a grassy anchorages almost taking out a catamaran and heading for a pier the second time. Convinced that the whole boat was worth whatever a great anchor would cost we researched and read great reviews for the Rocna.

 

Roughly a year later, and many easy anchors around various spots on the islands, we had a club trip to a small anchorage called Pelican’s on Santa Cruz Island. We got all the way out there with no problems, came into the anchorage where there were already seven boats so we had to maneuver. Just then our engine stalled and died, we were going about 4 knots, no sails and headed right for the rock wall. What did we do? Ran up and dropped the Rocna. She dropped, hit, and snagged the bottom. We slowly came to a stop and the boat gently turned to face in the same direction as the others. We were parked! We never moved from the spot. She set and held the rest of the weekend. Other boats had to reset their anchors many times, with even one boat taking 2 hours to get a good set. We told them about the Rocna but I guess it takes two near hits and a dead stop to make us sold on it for life. It isn’t hard to pay a good price for an anchor when you have already invested so much in your boat, it can be the difference between a great weekend or salvage fees.

Wainui, Cal 48

Mark C. and Stephanie Y.